collective-history:

Ronnie the Bren Gun Girl, factory worker and propaganda photo icon of WWII - Canada’s answer to Rosie the Riveter 

collective-history:

Ronnie the Bren Gun Girl, factory worker and propaganda photo icon of WWII - Canada’s answer to Rosie the Riveter 

(Reblogged from collectivehistory-deactivated20)

mitarbeiter:

Heute mal wieder bunt gemischt, ganz ähnlich wie sich unser verwirrter Sommer gerade zeigt: unsere Blog-Empfehlungen zum Wochenende!


Bauchgefühle ist eine Bildersammlung, die die Kuriosität, den Humor, die Ästhetik feiert. Alles nur aus einem Bauchgefühl heraus!

Deutsche Blogs auf Tumblr ist, na klar, eine Sammlung eingereichter Blogs in deutscher Sprache. Thematisch sehr gemischt, aber immer auf Deutsch.

Die Monopolisten bringen euch Kulturtipps, interessante Clips, witzige Bilder und vieles mehr. 

Viel Vergnügen!

(Reblogged from mitarbeiter)
drake-reynolds:

gay jocks, one of the best kinds of gays!

drake-reynolds:

gay jocks, one of the best kinds of gays!

(Source: sluttymcdickslut)

(Reblogged from gayamore)
timetosaveme:

This is powerful, almost too powerful. How many of you feel hurt when you see this? How many of you feel sad for her or for people that will put her down for her body? Has society brainwashed us into making us believe this is “ugly” ? I dont know the answers, but maybe this will make you think twice.

timetosaveme:

This is powerful, almost too powerful. How many of you feel hurt when you see this? How many of you feel sad for her or for people that will put her down for her body? Has society brainwashed us into making us believe this is “ugly” ? I dont know the answers, but maybe this will make you think twice.

(Reblogged from northernriver)

mythologyofblue:

Paul Schutzer, A Lebanese businessman, Edmond Khayat, carries an 85-pound wooden cross to protest the Berlin Wall, October 1961. Source: Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images


(Reblogged from northernriver)

Eyes…

(Reblogged from gayamore)
collective-history:

Hanging around at Woodstock ca. 1969

collective-history:

Hanging around at Woodstock ca. 1969

(Reblogged from collectivehistory-deactivated20)
(Reblogged from gayamore)

(Source: dickhaven)

(Reblogged from gayamore)

Dear hypothetically gay son,

You’re gay. Obviously you already know that, because you told us at the dinner table last night. I apologize for the awkward silence afterwards, but I was chewing. It was like when we’re at a restaurant and the waiter comes up mid-bite and asks how the meal is, only in this metaphor you are the waiter, and instead of asking me about my meal, you said you were gay. I don’t know why I needed to explain that. I think I needed to find a funny way to repeat the fact that you’re gay… because that is what it sounds like in my head right now: “My son is gay. My son is gay. My son is gay.”

Let me be perfectly clear: I love you. I will always love you. Since being gay is part of who you are, I love that you’re gay. I’m just trying to wrap my head around the idea. If you sensed any sadness in my silence last night, it was because I was surprised that I was surprised. Ideally, I would have already known. Since you were an embryo, my intent has always been to really know you for who you are and not who I expect you to be. And yet, I was taken by surprise at last night’s dinner. Have I said “surprise” enough in this paragraph? One more time: Surprise!

OK. Let’s get a few things straight about how things are going to be.

Our home is a place of safety and love. The world has dealt you a difficult card. While LGBT people are becoming more accepted, it is still a difficult path to walk. You’re going to experience hate and anger and misunderstandings about who you are out in the world. That will not happen here. You need to know with every fiber of who you are that when you walk in the front door of your home, you are safe, and you are loved. Your mother is in complete agreement with me on this.
I am still, as always, your biggest defender. Just because you’re gay doesn’t mean you’re any less capable of taking care of and defending yourself. That said, if you need me to stand next to you or in front of you, write letters, sign petitions, advocate, or anything else, I am here. I would go to war for you.

If you’re going to have boys over, you now need to leave your bedroom door open. Sorry, kiddo. Them’s the breaks. I couldn’t have girls in my room with the door shut, so you don’t get to have boys.

You and I are going to revisit that talk we had about safe sex. I know it’s going to be awkward for both of us, but it is important. I need to do some research first, so let’s give it a few weeks. If you have questions or concerns before then, let me know.

That’s enough for now. Feel free to view this letter as a contract. If I ever fail to meet any of the commitments made herein, pull it out and hold me to account. I’ll end with this: You are not broken. You are whole, and beautiful. You are capable and compassionate. You and your sister are the best things I have ever done with my life, and I couldn’t be prouder of the people you’ve become.

Love,
Dad

P.S. Thanks to a few key Supreme Court decisions and the Marriage Equality Act of 2020, you’re legally able to get married. When I was your age, that was just an idea. Pretty cool, huh?


(from John Kinnear)

From Huffington’s Post’s “Dear Hypothetical Gay Son” (via knowhomo)
(Reblogged from northernriver)